Article - Issue 50, March 2012

Ingenia@50

Dr Scott Steedman CBE FREng and Derek Hanson FREng

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Top left: The Stabilisation of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, issue 10 Top right: True Liner: the creation of the Queen Mary 2, issue 26 Bottom right: Engineering the puppets used in War Horse, issue 40 Bottom left: Marine turbines, issue 46

Top left: The Stabilisation of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, issue 10 Top right: True Liner: the creation of the Queen Mary 2, issue 26 Bottom right: Engineering the puppets used in War Horse, issue 40 Bottom left: Marine turbines, issue 46

When Ingenia was launched in July 1999, Sir David Davies CBE FREng FRS, then President of The Royal Academy of Engineering, said: “The purpose of Ingenia is to inform, educate and stimulate those at senior levels who are members of the engineering profession or who have interest in engineering.”

This is the 50th issue of Ingenia and the magazine continues to go from strength to strength. We have worked hard in recent years to reach a wider audience than was originally envisaged, including young people interested in STEM subjects and a broad circle of friends and supporters of engineering in general and the Academy in particular. Circulation has risen rapidly (it now stands at over 11,000) and the number of readers has also multiplied (surveys show that two to three people read each issue). The Ingenia website receives around 25,000 visits each month.

None of this would have been possible without the sustained commitment of the present Managing Editor, Dominic Joyeux, his editorial team at the Academy and the Editorial Board, whose members are drawn from the Fellowship together with Michael Kenward OBE, a former editor of New Scientist, who was invited to join the Board in 2004.

Sponsorship has always been very important for the continued welfare of Ingenia. From the outset, the Academy Council was clear that external funding sources should cover most of the cost of producing the magazine. The long-term support of Arup, BAE Systems, Mott MacDonald, Rolls-Royce, Thames Water and, more recently, Bosch, Lloyd’s Register and ConocoPhillips has been vital in achieving this and is greatly appreciated by the Academy.

Top: Inspiring Future Engineers, issue 32 Middle: Large Hadron Collider, issue 35 Bottom: Stormwater Management and Road Tunnel (SMART), issue 30

Top: Inspiring Future Engineers, issue 32 Middle: Large Hadron Collider, issue 35 Bottom: Stormwater Management and Road Tunnel (SMART), issue 30

The content of the magazine has changed over the years. Early issues contained 10 to 14 feature articles in a magazine of 64 to 72 pages. More recent issues usually have six or seven feature articles in 52 to 56 pages together with a range of other stories, news and letter pages. A Profile section was introduced, in which eminent Fellows of the Academy are interviewed about their careers and on how they see current and future challenges in engineering. In Brief, another spread in the magazine, provides information on current events or specific achievements that are linked to the world of engineering. An Innovation Watch feature at the back of the magazine is intended to close each issue with an inspiring engineering achievement on the brink of market success. Over 13 years, and across some 400 feature articles, Ingenia has covered a wide range of engineering subjects from creating the acoustics in an opera house to growing a new trachea on a tissue scaffold. All of these are now available online and may be downloaded as pdf files for reference at www.ingenia.org.uk In the next issue Ingenia will focus on the engineering behind the London 2012 Olympics.

Looking to the future, the Board will continue to seek new articles that embrace the rich diversity of engineering in an accessible style that will inform our readers and showcase the best of UK engineering.

Dr Scott Steedman CBE FREng
Derek Hanson FREng

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