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  • Chemical
  • Food & agriculture
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 97

Non-alcoholic beer and wine

Sales of non-alcoholic and low-alcohol drinks have soared in recent years, more than doubling since before the pandemic. So how do manufacturers make them alcohol free while still tasting the same?

  • Chemical
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Issue 97

How to remediate forever chemicals

Move over, microplastics, there’s a troubling new pollutant in town, used to manufacture iPhone chips, firefighting foams and many more everyday items. So how do we get rid of forever chemicals for good?

Quick read

A container ship viewed from above, with green cranes on the dock.
  • Energy
  • Chemical

How green methanol can help us decarbonise

Green methanol is an alternative fuel getting a lot of attention. What's the latest, and could it help clean up the notoriously hard-to-decarbonise shipping sector?

Quick read

A wind turbine on a hillside in the mountains
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Chemical
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 96

How do electrolysers work?

Electrolysers are a critical net zero technology used to produce green hydrogen.

  • Design & manufacturing
  • Chemical
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Materials
  • Innovation Watch

Kicking single-use plastics to the curb

This spider-silk inspired plastic alternative produces no plastic alternatives – unlike existing "compostable" plastics.

Quick read

  • Transport
  • Energy
  • Chemical
  • How I got here

Q&A: Titi Oliyide

From the Elizabeth line to green hydrogen, safety engineer Titi Oliyide wants to see her engineering achievements take shape in a way that helps people.

Quick read

A woman standing in front of a sign for COP27 that says "Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt 2022"
  • Chemical
  • Environment & sustainability
  • How I got here
  • Issue 94

Q&A: Isabelle Pickett

A chemical engineering degree set Isabelle Pickett on a path to advocating for girls in STEM and net zero careers – and setting up her own tutoring business along the way.

Quick read

An engineer working with steel for a foundation, wearing a hard hat.
  • Chemical
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability

Why safety engineering is key for green hydrogen and net zero

When engineering goes wrong, it makes the headlines. Thankfully, there’s a whole field dedicated to making sure it goes right: safety engineering.

Quick read

  • Chemical
  • Health & medical
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 89

Wastewater epidemiology

Sampling and testing of wastewater is helping governments across the world to track COVID-19 infections on a large scale.

A portrait of Professor Rafellea Ocone holding an hourglass timer.
  • Chemical
  • Profiles
  • Issue 89

The ethics of engineering net zero

Professor Raffaella Ocone OBE FREng FRSE's career journey encompasses biofuels, carbon capture, and even landslides and volcanoes. She's now pioneering teaching ethics to engineering students.

Quick read

  • Chemical
  • Environment & sustainability
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 88

Compostable plastics

Compostable plastics can be turned – alongside food and other organic waste – into compost. But how environmentally friendly are they really?

Quick read

  • Chemical
  • How I got here
  • Issue 88

Q&A: Michelle Watiki

From placements at Xerox and Rolls Royce, to becoming a board member for the Association for Black and Ethnic Minority Engineers, chemical engineering graduate Michelle Watiki hopes to apply her knowledge to sustainability and net zero, as well as helping future engineering students.

A field of wheat with a factory in the background containing silos and smoke coming out of a chimney.
  • Chemical
  • Issue 78

Biofuels’ journey to the mainstream

Liquid biofuels today make up about 8% of road and non-road fuel supplies in the UK. The government plans to reach nearly 10% by 2020 in order to reduce CO₂ emissions. It has also laid out targets to incentivise innovation and the production of ‘development fuels’.

A headshot of Olivia Sweeney at the University of Edinburgh during graduation.
  • Chemical
  • How I got here
  • Issue 75

Q&A: Olivia Sweeney

Olivia Sweeney sources aroma chemicals to create fragrances at cosmetics company Lush. She is working on finding new, more sustainable sources of fragrance ingredients, with an interest in the research and development of chemical production from waste streams.