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A concept image of the WaveSub underwater, showing its mooring layout. The wavesub platform floats at the surface of the ocean but it moored to the ocean floor with cables attached to anchors.
  • Energy
  • Issue 83

Tapping the power of the tides in the UK

Marine energy is the largest untapped source of renewable energy. However, generating energy from the oceans has challenged engineers for 50 years. Neil Cumins reports on two offshore renewable energy centres at opposite ends of the country, and the wave and tidal energy projects they have helped to refine.

Quick read

A man standing in front of a display that says "Welcome to COP26" on several shelves full of different plants.
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Electricals & electronics
  • How I got here

Q&A: Mark Goudie

Mark Goudie is one of the youngest engineering Fellows in the UK, an inventor, and an engineer in the energy sector.

Quick read

A container ship viewed from above, with green cranes on the dock.
  • Energy
  • Chemical

How green methanol can help us decarbonise

Green methanol is an alternative fuel getting a lot of attention. What's the latest, and could it help clean up the notoriously hard-to-decarbonise shipping sector?

Quick read

A wind turbine on a hillside in the mountains
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Chemical
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 96

How do electrolysers work?

Electrolysers are a critical net zero technology used to produce green hydrogen.

Quick read

An aerial photo of a wind farm producing renewable energy, which is used by electrolysers to make green hydrogen.
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Energy
  • Innovation Watch
  • Issue 96

The clean energy pioneers

Ceres Power have found a way to make green hydrogen – thought to be an essential part of our energy transition – at scale.

Quick read

  • Transport
  • Energy
  • Chemical
  • How I got here

Q&A: Titi Oliyide

From the Elizabeth line to green hydrogen, safety engineer Titi Oliyide wants to see her engineering achievements take shape in a way that helps people.

Quick read

An engineer working with steel for a foundation, wearing a hard hat.
  • Chemical
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability

Why safety engineering is key for green hydrogen and net zero

When engineering goes wrong, it makes the headlines. Thankfully, there’s a whole field dedicated to making sure it goes right: safety engineering.

Quick read

Two people stand on the side of a hill writing on clipboards with other hills in the background
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • How I got here
  • Issue 93

Q&A: Katie Ireland

On coming back from a career break, Katie Ireland switched fields from oil and gas to renewables, and was awarded ‘Returner of the Year’ at the 2022 Engineering Talent Awards.

  • Energy
  • Opinion
  • Issue 93

The challenges of creating a hydrogen economy

Hydrogen is likely to play a critical role in achieving net zero, but the UK needs to act soon to avoid falling behind international competitors. So, how can government and the engineering community ensure this doesn’t happen?

An aerial photograph of the Orbital O2 tidal turbine in the ocean.
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • Issue 93

Making sure tidal power blades are fit for purpose

For tidal power to become a renewable energy source, engineers need to be able to test the components that will have to operate in the severe offshore conditions around the British Isles. FastBlade is a new facility that can help with this.

Three engineers in a lab, wearing lab coats and glasses, standing behind a desk full of science equipment, reagents and wires.
  • Energy
  • Opinion
  • Issue 85

How can the UK solve its carbon problem?

Dieter Helm CBE, Professor of Economic Policy at the University of Oxford, sets out how Britain can lead the way on climate change action and use the opportunity of the COVID-19 pandemic to meet its net-zero target by 2050.

Quick read

A ground air source heat pump outside of a building.
  • Energy
  • Environment & sustainability
  • How does that work?
  • Issue 82

Ground source heat pumps

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) have been used for many years in North America, Sweden and Germany. These geothermal systems harness natural heat from underground to provide heating for buildings. Now they are being increasingly deployed in homes and commercial buildings in the UK.

  • Energy
  • Issue 78

A new contender for energy storage

Energy storage has long been a challenge for those in the renewable energy field – what happens to unused energy generated by solar or wind power for example? Highview Power is trying to solve this problem and a new system of storing it as liquid air could provide answers.

Quick read

  • Energy
  • Materials
  • How I got here
  • Issue 77

Q&A: Rahul Mandal

Dr Rahul Mandal is a Research Associate in the Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield, and winner of The Great British Bake Off 2018.

A person in a williams' racing suit and helmet in a supermarket, holding a basket of groceries.
  • Design & manufacturing
  • Energy
  • Issue 77

Warm response to fluid dynamics

Technology that makes racing cars go faster is now saving energy in supermarkets and reducing the ‘frozen aisle’ effect often found near the chiller cabinets. An established engineering company and a startup business worked together to bring this new engineering to the market.

A headshot of Dr Shaun Fitzgeralsn FREng wearing a suit, smiling and resting his hands on a banister.
  • Energy
  • Profiles
  • Issue 76

Building a sustainable career

Dr Shaun Fitzgerald FREng has moved between academia, strategic consulting and running his own business, and is now the new Director of the Royal Institution. A career that started in geothermal energy research moved to natural ventilation in buildings, leading to a business that has changed the nature of building design.